1. Take special care and slow down when passing.

They may need to move unexpectedly and not have an opportunity to signal their intentions.

2. Indicate clearly

Indicate clearly and in plenty of time when turning and stopping.

3. Know your blind spots

 Know your blind spots, especially when driving vans, trucks or buses, and check again for cyclists.

4. Take another look at intersections

Take another look at intersections. Cycles are smaller than other vehicles and may not be easily seen.

5. Avoid overtaking a cyclist just before you turn at an intersection.

Avoid overtaking a cyclist just before you turn at an intersection. Take care when passing cyclists on the open road. Slow down and, ideally, leave at least 1.5 metres of space between you and the cyclist. Check rear-view mirrors and look over your shoulder before you open a car door at the roadside.

Jonathan Stutz

6. Take care when passing cyclists on the open road.

Slow down and, ideally, leave at least 1.5 metres of space between you and the cyclist.

7. Check rear-view

Check rear-view mirrors and look over your shoulder before you open a car door at the roadside.

8. Slow down and be alert when visibility is reduced

 Slow down and be alert when visibility is reduced. Cyclists are often hard to see, and are even more so in the rain or in low-light conditions.

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4 Comments

  1. Barrie Clark

    Tips for cyclists on sharing the road with motor vechicals. E.g. hi viz, lights, road code etc.

    Reply
  2. Ted Fletcher

    I have read a suggestion that if you open the driver’s door with your left hand (inside hand, you’re more inclined to glance at the mirror and look behind you before opening the door.
    Guess when we start using the parking to protect cycle ways from the traffic the opening o the left door would be advised to use the inside hand in a similar fashion.
    Try it and see if it works for you.

    Reply
  3. Roy

    On sharing the road with cyclists I suggest that you add that motorists should indicate right when overtaking – this means that the motorist becomes conscious of the overtaking manoeuvre and also indicates to following traffic that they are moving out and that there is a slow moving vehicle that they are passing.
    It interests me that Kiwi motorists indicate when pulling in to the left after overtaking but rarely indicate when making the manoeuvre.

    Reply
  4. culpa

    Thanks for sharing yοur thoughts. I truly appreciate youг efforts and I ԝill be waiting fοг
    your further post thɑnks once again.

    Reply

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